Friday, January 21, 2011

Burn Pit Soldiers Receive Treatment at Vanderbilt University for Lung Disease



Soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, who were exposed to smoke, dust and other toxic fumes from burn pits, are reporting various illnesses, including respiratory disease. Dr. Robert Miller, MD, Associate Professor of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and his colleagues at Vanderbilt University, are providing medical care and to the injured soldiers.


lawsuit was filed alleging that KRB, Inc.
(NYSE KRB) endangered the health and safety of American soldiers in
Iraq and Afghanistan by exposing them to huge quantities of toxic 
dust, fumes and other air pollution by burning unsorted waste in vast 
open-air pits without any safety controls.



Click here to read more about burn pit claims for benefits and lawsuits. Call Jon L. Gelman at 973.696.7900 or e-mail jon@gelmans.com

View YouTube Video: http://tinyurl.com/67a3g2s

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Burn Pit Illnesses Called The "Agent Orange" of This Generation

The news reports that the toxic exposure of soldiers and civilians to dust and fumes  from burn pits used in Iraq and Afghanistan is "this generation's Agent Orange." The plight of a sick soldier who is suffering from lung disease, allegedly caused by his exposure to fumes and dust  from burn pits, was recently reported by WRISTV (Corpus Christi, TX).

The television news service reported, "After returning from a deployment to Iraq, the returning soldier struggled to obtain medical treatment for his respiratory condition. 'Since we weren't getting the right treatment here locally we had to travel out of state on our own expense to get the right treatment, and they went ahead and did the lung biopsy and that's how they found out I had the constrictive bronchiolitis,' he said."

The US Government Accountability Office released the Afghanistan and Iraq Report, in response to a request by Congress. It states that of the four burn pits they surveyed in Iraq, all standards outlined in 2009 for burn pit operations were not met.

A lawsuit was filed alleging that KRB, Inc.
(NYSE KRB) endangered the health and safety of American soldiers in
Iraq and Afghanistan by exposing them to huge quantities of toxic 
dust, fumes and other air pollution by burning unsorted waste in vast 
open-air pits without any safety controls.



Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Soldier Exposed to Burn Pits in Iraq Succumbs to Lymphoma

The Long Island Newsday has reported that Sgt. William McKenna, age 41, who was exposed to the dust and fumes from burn pits while deployed in Iraq, has died from lymphoma, a rare form of cancer. He was deployed in 2003 and had been suffering from the rare cancer for over a year.


His family is part of a lawsuit filed against Kellog Brown and Root (KBR) and Halliburton.  The lawsuit alleges that the civilian contractors operated to the US Military in an unsafe manner exposing soldiers and other civilians to toxic smoke and fumes.


According to the article, a spokes person from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs stated, "The Department of Veterans Affairs is concerned about the effects of exposure to toxins produced by burn pits on veterans returning from the current conflicts." 


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